Scaled Works of Satoshi Kamiya 07-08

Origami, Scaled Works of Satoshi Kamiya

Moving on to the next couple of models from Satoshi Kamiya’s first book, a Kirin is a kind of unicorn-tiger that may have multiple horns and may be a giraffe in disguise, while a tyrannosaur is a member of a Cretaceous dinosaur species, many of whom lately seem predisposed to star in Hollywood movies. Most recently, a tyrannosaur stared in “RAPTOR Attack Team” with Star Lord and the title team.

WOSK_107 - KIRIN (1) WOSK_107 - KIRIN (5)

I think the Kirin is quite spectacular. He has this kind of bounding feel to him, so I thought I’d have him bounding around the chocobo.

WOSK_107 - KIRIN (2) WOSK_107 - KIRIN (3)

Hmn, that’s odd. Usually I have a summary, show pictures, then say stuff about the above pictures. But I already said stuff about the pictures above.

WOSK_108 - TYRANNOSAURUS (7) WOSK_108 - TYRANNOSAURUS (5)

His Tyrannosaurus isn’t really the most complicated, but his less complex models tend to have something special. This Tyranno has a very endearing face to him. Ironically, while most people think of smaller dinosaurs as larger than they are, this one has been scaled down dramatically, unless the bird stands at a representative height of 4 meters.

Maybe I should post some more random models I like too. I had gotten Fumiaki’s Origami Fantasy before it went out of print, and it has some great dinosaurs.

Crease Pattern Challenge 002

Crease Pattern Challenge, Origami

I missed one last week and have had a lot of posts of Kamiya models, so here’s another post with a different designer.

OTMCP_002 - AKUMA - MAEKAWA (1)  OTMCP_002 - AKUMA - MAEKAWA (5)

Jun Maekawa has some great (as well as famous) models and was chosen for Tanteidan’s second Crease Pattern Challenge (Issue 56). This Devil has also been diagramed in several books. I think the crease pattern version is a little more streamlined, but it may just be easier to fold than when diagramed (some models are that way you know).

OTMCP_002 - AKUMA - MAEKAWA (2)  MAEKAWA - ONI (2)

His Devil is extremely popular, with some other designers coming up with variations of it. He has some of his own variations in the book “Viva! Origami”, such as the Oni above.

MAEKAWA - SAMURAI HELMET BEETLE (3) MAEKAWA - SAMURAI HELMET BEETLE (6) MAEKAWA - SAMURAI HELMET BEETLE (4)

These are not from the crease pattern challenge, but I thought it might be fun to include these Samurai Helmet Beetles (which are also designed by Mr. Maekawa). The earlier one is shown above, while examples of his Flying Samurai Helmet Beetle are below. Diagrams for the flying one can be found in the book “Genuine Origami”. I really like the flying one and almost have it memorized.

MAEKAWA - SAMURAI HELMET BEETLE FLYING (2)

Scaled Works of Satoshi Kamiya 04-06

Origami, Scaled Works of Satoshi Kamiya

Here’s another set of models from the book “Works of Satoshi Kamiya 1995-2003”, all folded with the same size of paper.

WOSK_104 - PEGASUS (1) WOSK_104 - PEGASUS (2)

I’m pretty sure this is his earliest Pegasus. He has some newer versions here and here.

WOSK_105 - HERCULES BEETLE (3)  WOSK_105 - HERCULES BEETLE (7) WOSK_105 - HERCULES BEETLE (1) WOSK_105 - HERCULES BEETLE (6) WOSK_105 - HERCULES BEETLE (2)

I think I did ok on the Hercules Beetle, but it’s still kind of hard to see. Here’s his model, on his site.

WOSK_106 - DIVINE DRAGON (2) WOSK_106 - DIVINE DRAGON (4)WOSK_106 - DIVINE DRAGON (1)

The last one for now is #6 in the book: Divine Dragon Bahamut. He’s one of the more detailed models, so he comes out pretty tiny compared to the others.

Crease Pattern Challenge 001

Crease Pattern Challenge, Origami

The Japan Origami Academic Society puts out a magazine bimonthly. (And by that I mean once every two months. Not twice a month. It’s a terrible word. Maybe “hexaannually” would be better?) They also have yearly conventions and put out a very nice book that corresponds to each meeting.

Starting with issue 55, the magazine has had a section called “Crease Pattern Challenge”. This is only a single page with a crease pattern for people to try to fold. A crease pattern is just a square with lines on it that represent the final folds of the model. The first of these is actually the “Ancient Dragon” by Satoshi Kamiya. You already know I like his models, and this model is also in his book.

OTMCP_001 - ANCIENT DRAGON - KAMIYA

I think there are slight differences between this one and the one in his book. Since I’m going to put up the book Ancient Dragon soon anyway, I’m adding some other models here for, like, flavour, or something.

KAMIYA - BAHAMUT BL (1) KAMIYA - BAHAMUT BL (5)

Kamiya’s Ancient Dragon and Bahamut models are actually pretty similar. While the final Bahamut might not show it, Bahamut BL (or God Dragon Bahamut) looks a bit like the Ancient Dragon.

KAMIYA - BAHAMUT BL (2) KAMIYA - BAHAMUT BL (3)

While Kamiya’s looks like the dragon it’s supposed to, mine looks more like a dragon-bird. I got kind of hung up on there only being two legs, I guess. Still, I think a dragon-raven looks pretty nice.

KAMIYA - BAHAMUT ZERO (2)

I accidentally changed Bahamut ZERO as well. As I said before, his Bahamuts have a kind of similar pattern to his Ancient Dragon. Due to that, I ended up folding the ZERO model like a dragon initially and just liked it so much I kept it that way. He’s also got some kind of insect-like mandibles or maybe side teeth. I can’t tell if that’s in the original model too; it’s so shiny.

KAMIYA - BAHAMUT ZERO (3) KAMIYA - BAHAMUT ZERO (4)

I hope to stumble through some more Crease Pattern Challenges, but some are quite difficult. So, we’ll see.

Kappa かっぱ

Origami, Original Designs

WKO_001 - KAPPA (107)

This is a design I came up with (probably my first one), but, before all that, what is a kappa?

A kappa (pronounced like pappa, Frank Zappa, or rapper; more so if you’re speaking Japanese) is a mythical water monster from Japan. It’s a lot like a turtle, but it’s bipedal (usually) and has a dish-like dent on top of its head that holds magic water which gives it power. It kills and eats swimming people by coming up under them and disemboweling them. It also likes to eat cucumbers. Supposedly, they are polite enough that they will bow to you if you bow to them first, even though they then spill their magic water and become weak and manageable. For extra info and pictures:

Kappa on Wikipedia
Kappa on Japanese Buddhist Statuary

My origami kappa is pretty simple, but I’m quite proud of the color change. Paper that is different colors on each side will make the kappa one color and its shell the other color.

WKO_001 - KAPPA (108) WKO_001 - KAPPA (109)

He also has a turtle beak and an indent on the top of his head for water. You can’t really put water in it though. I mean, you can, but it’s paper, so it’s not a good idea. The dent is more for show.

WKO_001 - KAPPA (111)

I came up with this before I was really designing things. I just sort of fell into it by luck. It probably came about from my folding John Montroll’s Cerberus (from Mythological Creatures and the Chinese Zodiac in Origami) so much. It’s not all that similar, but it has a similar start. I figure I found the kappa while playing around making so many Cereberii.

Scaled Works of Satoshi Kaimya 01-03

Origami, Scaled Works of Satoshi Kamiya

As you can tell, one of my favourite origami artists is Satoshi Kamiya. His first book, Works of Satoshi Kamiya 1995-2003, has lots of great models. I always have trouble visualizing the size difference from an initial square to model, even when it’s listed, so, in addition to folding these models, I’m folding them all with the same initial size of square. Hopefully that’s kind of interesting.

WOSK_100 - BOOK (2)

Anyway, the square size is 27.9 cm. I wanted a good way to scale the models between each other, so I just decided to scale them against model #12 in the book, “The Yellow Bird”, who stands, from the bottom of the feet to the top of the head, at about 10 cm. These first models are typically a bit easier than the later ones, so here are 3 to start off with.

WOSK_101 - CARNOTAURUS (1)WOSK_101 - CARNOTAURUS (4)

The first is a Carnotaurus. He has a cute face. He also comes down enough in size that he makes the bird look gigantic.

WOSK_102 - EAGLE RAY (1) WOSK_102 - EAGLE RAY (3)

While fairly simple, the Eagle Ray has a very eloquent design, with the underside (picture without bird) showing the mouth and… other ray stuff, as opposed to the sleek top side of the body (shown with bird). This time, the ray dwarfs the bird.

WOSK_103 - SPLASH (1) WOSK_103 - SPLASH (3)

Splash!, the third model, is a bit different than all the others, as it includes part of a landscape. It also captures an inherently more active scene, with a bird landing in water.

There are 19 total models in the book. I’ll keep posting them out about 2 at a time till it’s finished out.