Crease Pattern Challenge 039

Crease Pattern Challenge, Origami

Challenge 39 is Seiji Nishikawa’s 15° Oriential Longheaded Locust.

I’ve covered quite a few Nishikawa’s models due to him having so many crease pattern challenges. I’m sure there are quite a few I’ve missed, but I’m not sure which I’ve put up here and which I haven’t. It probably would have been better to put the second half of Origami Insects Vol. 1 here (instead of with Challenge 14) as this Challenge immediately follows a Kawahata one that I put the first half with. But I didn’t do that. Oops.

OTMCP_039 - ORIENTAL LONGHEADED LOCUST 15 DEGREES - NISHIKAWA (1) OTMCP_039 - ORIENTAL LONGHEADED LOCUST 15 DEGREES - NISHIKAWA (3) OTMCP_039 - ORIENTAL LONGHEADED LOCUST 15 DEGREES - NISHIKAWA (4) OTMCP_039 - ORIENTAL LONGHEADED LOCUST 15 DEGREES - NISHIKAWA (2)

Anyway, this is a nice model with an interesting design using fifths and equilateral triangles. Not my favourite bug tho.

Crease Pattern Challenge 038

Crease Pattern Challenge, Origami

Issue 94’s challenge (#38) is Fumiaki Kawahata’s Shachihoko. This mythical animal is a tiger-headed fish that causes rain. Shachihoko statues are found on the ends of lots of Japanese temple roofs. They are usually shown resting on their necks with the body curving up. Here’s a pretty good one on a castle in a travel log, or you can google it.

OTMCP_038 - SHACHIHOKO - KAWAHATA (3) OTMCP_038 - SHACHIHOKO - KAWAHATA (4)

Kawahata’s Shachihoko emphasizes the body rather than the head. It’s a little surprising, but it allows him to focus on the fins and scales and making the model much more 3D.

OTMCP_038 - SHACHIHOKO - KAWAHATA (6) OTMCP_038 - SHACHIHOKO - KAWAHATA (1) OTMCP_038 - SHACHIHOKO - KAWAHATA (5)

Fumiaki Kawahata is one of the two authors of Origami Insects Vol. 1. I covered the models of the other author, Seiji Nishikawa, with Crease Pattern Challenge 14. Below are the remaining models, which are all designed by Kawahata. (He already shows how the models will scale relative to the initial square length in the book, so I’m not doing that this time.)

Jambar Giant Scarab

OI1_01 (101) OI1_01 (102) OI1_01 (103)

Jambar Giant Scarab (update)

OI1_02 (101) OI1_02 (102) OI1_02 (103) OI1_02 (104)

Flying Cicada

OI1_03 (102) OI1_03 (103) OI1_03 (104)

Neptune Giant Beetle

OI1_04 (101) OI1_04 (102)

Caucasus Giant Beetle

OI1_05 (101) OI1_05 (102) OI1_05 (103)

Golden-Ringed Dragonfly (the OrigamiHouse website lists it as Golden-Ringed Bragonfly)

OI1_06 (101) OI1_06 (103) OI1_06 (104)

Japanese Giant Grasshopper

OI1_07 (101) OI1_07 (102) OI1_07 (103)

Leaf Insect

OI1_08 (101) OI1_08 (102)

Eupatorus Horned Beetle

OI1_09 (101) OI1_09 (102) OI1_09 (103)

I like all the insects from both authors, but I’m extra partial to the Leaf Insect and Golden-Ringed Dragonfly.

Crease Pattern Challenge 037

Crease Pattern Challenge, Origami

Are sheep sacred in Japan? Don’t get me wrong, I’m basically ok with sheep. Crease Pattern Challenge 91 is a spectacular ram by Naoto Horiguchi. But that’s pretty far off, and, between this and Challenge 24, I’m tired of basic sheep with fairly tricky puzzle crease patterns. Crease Pattern Challenge 37 is Hideo Komatsu’s Sheep.

OTMCP_037 - SHEEP - KOMATSU (101) OTMCP_037 - SHEEP - KOMATSU (102)

OTMCP_037 - SHEEP - KOMATSU (103) OTMCP_037 - SHEEP - KOMATSU (104)

That’s not to say it isn’t a good model. The body is well done, and I especially love the sheep’s sheep face and sheep ears. However, I ended up screwing this up a few time before folding it correctly. Luckily, it’s diagrammed a little later in Issue 105. I folded that first and figured out a couple of things.

KOMATSU - SHEEP(103) KOMATSU - SHEEP(102)

The biggest thing I learned is that the reference lines and points on the crease pattern are extremely close to ones that are easier to determine than the real points (like a line very close to something simple to find, like a quarter line). In some models, a slight shift like this might end up ok, with only a slightly thinner or fatter model. But these lines link up with each other and have sinks that need more precision. Specifically, the head will be much further off than it should be without the exact reference points.

I also found that there was a cool locking mechanism in the middle inside (which I didn’t get in the crease pattern version) and why the crease pattern version is useful. The final model’s body has large, flat sections representing wool. The diagrammed version has many more fold lines crossing these areas to determine the intersection points. The crease pattern sheep is a lot cleaner in these areas.

KOMATSU - SHEEP(104)
Diagram Lock
OTMCP_037 - SHEEP - KOMATSU (104) OTMCP_037 - SHEEP - KOMATSU (105)
My Incomplete Lock on the Crease Pattern
OTMCP_037 - SHEEP - KOMATSU (106) KOMATSU - SHEEP(105)
OTMCP_037 - SHEEP - KOMATSU (107) KOMATSU - SHEEP(106)
Left: Crease Pattern; Right: Diagram

Crease Pattern Challenge 036

Crease Pattern Challenge, Origami

36 is Noboru Miyajima’s bat. He’s had previous Crease Pattern Challenges of a Knight on a Pegasus (#4) and a Propeller Plane (#12). His previous models are impressive, but something about this one makes me partial to it. It just has a kind of lifelike feel I think.

OTMCP_036 - BAT - MIYAJIMA (5) OTMCP_036 - BAT - MIYAJIMA (4)

I’ve made a few of these, but I only found my uncoloured one. I know I gave a painted on away; guess I should have taken pictures first. Even white it looks really good. Albino bat.

OTMCP_036 - BAT - MIYAJIMA (6) OTMCP_036 - BAT - MIYAJIMA (1)

OTMCP_036 - BAT - MIYAJIMA (2) OTMCP_036 - BAT - MIYAJIMA (3)

Crease Pattern Challenge 035

Crease Pattern Challenge, Origami

Crease Pattern Challenge 35 in Issue 90 is another one of Takashi Hojyo’s human forms, Aquarius the water pourer (his 2005 version). He tends to go back and improve a lot of his older models, and this one is amazing. I wonder if he just liked the water pouring idea or if he was going to do a zodiac set. I noticed he likes sets, such as his Twelve Heavenly Generals. For examples, one of his generals, Vajra, has also been recently updated. But maybe it’s just that his zodiac sign might be Aquarius?

OTMCP_035 - AQUARIUS 2005 - HOJYO (102) OTMCP_035 - AQUARIUS 2005 - HOJYO (105)

Being a zodiac sign, this is also a mythological model. Aquarius represents Ganymede, a young boy from Troy. Zeus turned into an eagle and kidnapped him to make him immortal and serve as cupbearer of the gods on Olympus. Zeus chose Ganymede because he thought he was hot. K.

OTMCP_035 - AQUARIUS 2005 - HOJYO (108) OTMCP_035 - AQUARIUS 2005 - HOJYO (103) OTMCP_035 - AQUARIUS 2005 - HOJYO (111)

OTMCP_035 - AQUARIUS 2005 - HOJYO (107)

Anyway, the model is great. About a quarter of the paper is the water and jar. The arms are separate from the jar and are shaped to hold it. I should probably use more water to fold and shape things like this, but instead I used fishing line to hold the left arm to the jar for now (as you can clearly see). I kind of left the right arm dramatically far out. ¡Olé!

OTMCP_035 - AQUARIUS 2005 - HOJYO (101)  OTMCP_035 - AQUARIUS 2005 - HOJYO (112)

OTMCP_035 - AQUARIUS 2005 - HOJYO (113) OTMCP_035 - AQUARIUS 2005 - HOJYO (110)

Crease Pattern Challenge 034

Crease Pattern Challenge, Origami

Masashi Tanaka’s Tanaka Butterfly is Challenge 34 (in Issue 89. I forgot to mention before that “Treehoppers” was in Issue 88, “Gabriel” was 86, and Issue 87 didn’t include a crease pattern). He also had Challenge 18’s crane variations. He seems to be a big fan of similar variations because he also has four butterfly crease pattern variations. I also like variations a lot. Butterflies, not so much, so I’m just doing the main one.

OTMCP_034 - TANAKA BUTTERFLY - TANAKA (1) OTMCP_034 - TANAKA BUTTERFLY - TANAKA (2)

It’s been awhile. Apparently, I drew in the pattern in yellow on orange paper. I didn’t add water and let dry to help the shaping, which the head (antennae), legs, and lower body could use. Although they should be shaped to be closer together, the lower body has ridges along it.

OTMCP_034 - TANAKA BUTTERFLY - TANAKA (3) OTMCP_034 - TANAKA BUTTERFLY - TANAKA (4)

I do like the model, but there is a lot of shaping required to get it to look like Tanaka’s Butterfly shown with the crease pattern. Nobody’s asked me for this model, and I’m not personally interested in butterflies much. I’d also probably keep the face the same, because I like the cute simplistic style over the realistic one.

Crease Pattern Challenge 033

Crease Pattern Challenge, Origami

Challenge 33 is a Treehopper bug by Yoshio Tsuda. There are a lot of different looks to these bugs, which resemble thorns for camouflage. I think this one looks kind of like the main picture on the Wikipedia page, but it’s only a side view. The wings aren’t clear on the wiki picture, and this model has the main horn and two side ones that it looks like not all treehopper varieties have.

OTMCP_033 - TREEHOPPERS - TSUDA (106) OTMCP_033 - TREEHOPPERS - TSUDA (105) OTMCP_033 - TREEHOPPERS - TSUDA (107)

I like these kind of grid models because of how they collapse. I think I could have done better on the face, but I didn’t want to glue it or something. It’s a little odd being two pieces coming together.

OTMCP_033 - TREEHOPPERS - TSUDA (104) OTMCP_033 - TREEHOPPERS - TSUDA (108) OTMCP_033 - TREEHOPPERS - TSUDA (101)

Crease Pattern Challenge 032

Crease Pattern Challenge, Origami

Challenge 32, Takashi Hojyo’s Gabriel (Version 3), is another model that I made a while ago, took a couple of pictures of, then lost it. So, here are two Gabriels. At least I like Mr. Hojyo’s models a lot.

OTMCP_032 - GABRIEL V3 - HOJYO (1) OTMCP_032 - GABRIEL V3 - HOJYO (4)

This is another one of his models (like the Geistkämpher; wait, the Geistkämpher isn’t until Challenge 51? I thought I already covered that one.) that I tend to get a little carried away with and miss a polarity flip. This one is easier to catch, so I don’t usually miss it. It causes the lower half to be the flip side of the paper. This is most clear in the more yellow model.

OTMCP_032 - GABRIEL V3 - HOJYO (7)

Hojyo says the angel is like one from an Annunciation by Botticelli, so I’m thinking the middle part in his arms is part of his robe. I’ve always folded it like something he was holding, such as tablets. Hojyo’s Gabriel has the more cloth-like version.

OTMCP_032 - GABRIEL V3 - HOJYO (3)

Crease Pattern Challenge 031

Crease Pattern Challenge, Origami

Challenge 31 is Seiji Nishikawa’s 15°-Based Cat. I’m not sure how you name models by degrees, but I can see the tail and out from the center to the head both have 15° subdivisions.

OTMCP_031 - CAT 15 DEGREES - NISHIKAWA (4) OTMCP_031 - CAT 15 DEGREES - NISHIKAWA (5)

The head of my sitting, blue cat is more like the original model. However, he should be standing like the green one.

OTMCP_031 - CAT 15 DEGREES - NISHIKAWA (3) OTMCP_031 - CAT 15 DEGREES - NISHIKAWA (6)

I like the cat, but he’s more of a puzzle than grandiose. So here are a couple of models from Works of Seiji Nishikawa: his Tiger and Wagtail.

NISHIKAWA - TIGER (2) NISHIKAWA - TIGER (3) NISHIKAWA - WAGTAIL (1) NISHIKAWA - WAGTAIL (2)

The tiger keeps flattening out, so I tied a rope around him. A wagtail is a little bird.

NISHIKAWA - TIGER (5) NISHIKAWA - TIGER (4) NISHIKAWA - TIGER (6) NISHIKAWA - TIGER (7) NISHIKAWA - TIGER (8) NISHIKAWA - WAGTAIL (3)

OTMCP_031 - CAT 15 DEGREES - NISHIKAWA (1)

Crease Pattern Challenge 030

Crease Pattern Challenge, Origami

Challenge 30 is Seishi Kasumi’s “Mask of Ape”. It looks more like a monkey mask to me. The Japanese title of the model is “猿”, which can be monkey or ape, so I guess it can be either.

OTMCP_030 - MASK OF APE - KASUMI (110)

This is a pretty nifty 3D model. I initially didn’t like it too much, but it grew on me. The first time, I used rigid paper to hold the 3D shape, and, the second time, I used the flimsy paper I usually use. Both times I drew in a lot of the lines to make it easier.

OTMCP_030 - MASK OF APE - KASUMI (101) OTMCP_030 - MASK OF APE - KASUMI (104)

This first time I drew in the lines with red for mountain folds and blue for valley folds.

OTMCP_030 - MASK OF APE - KASUMI (106) OTMCP_030 - MASK OF APE - KASUMI (112)

Since I was better at keeping track the second time, I just used yellow highlighter to draw in lines. It lit up when the camera flash hit it for a neat effect. I hope it works the same way with a black light.

OTMCP_030 - MASK OF APE - KASUMI (109) OTMCP_030 - MASK OF APE - KASUMI (111) OTMCP_030 - MASK OF APE - KASUMI (113)