Crease Pattern Challenge 014

Crease Pattern Challenge, Origami

The Dragon by Seiji Nishikawa is Tanteidan’s Crease Pattern Challenge #14. You might be thinking, “Wasn’t that challenge #6?#6 was “Ryuu” (龍), an eastern style dragon with the Japanese word for dragon, and this one is “Dragon” (doragon/ドラゴン)  , to indicate a more western style. He is also more of a cartoon dragon, because he stands upright, like Charizards, Great Dragons, or Ice Dragons.

This crease pattern actually leaves out quite a few details, but that’s kind of a necessity because the folds double back quite a lot. That is, with all the details it would be a tangled mess to figure out, but, after folding the crease pattern for the initial shape, it should be easy enough to figure out with the final picture. Naturally, I first folded this without looking at the picture.

OTMCP_014 - DRAGON - NISHIKAWA (103) OTMCP_014 - DRAGON - NISHIKAWA (104) OTMCP_014 - DRAGON - NISHIKAWA (105)

He came out longer and more wyvernish than the original. While looking back at the final model during folding, I got:

OTMCP_014 - DRAGON - NISHIKAWA (106) OTMCP_014 - DRAGON - NISHIKAWA (107) OTMCP_014 - DRAGON - NISHIKAWA (108) OTMCP_014 - DRAGON - NISHIKAWA (109)

These make his body look more like the wyvern, but that’s only because the legs keep spreading from the center. Most of the features are very different, especially the head, which has eyes and a horn now. In any case, this illustrates the stylistic range you can get out of this crease pattern, and that’s pretty cool.

I also folded this one from diagrams in Works of Seiji Nishikawa, but that was a while ago. I have one that’s red (but only pictures) and one painted like the crease pattern ones. I wasn’t sure these were this dragon until I folded the crease pattern one. This is because of the tiny arms. I’m not a fan of these arms. T-rexes have bigger arms.

OTMCP_014 - DRAGON - NISHIKAWA (101) NISHIKAWA - DRAGON - WORKS OF(102) NISHIKAWA - DRAGON - WORKS OF(101) NISHIKAWA - DRAGON - WORKS OF(103)

For some other Nishikawa models, I thought it would be neat to do some other fantasy creatures, like his Pegasus, or Godzilla. But, since I already did that with the last Nishikawa crease pattern, I’m just going to do his half of Origami Insects Vol. 1.

Fumiaki Kawahata did the first half of this book’s models, and Nishikawa did the second. There are 8 total, so I’m just going to list them and show them in order.

Japanese Horned Beetle – Male

OI1_10 (101) OI1_10 (103) OI1_10 (104)

Japanese Horned Beetle – Female

OI1_11 (102) OI1_11 (103) OI1_11 (104)

Asiatic Locust

OI1_12 (101) OI1_12 (102)

Flying Asiatic Locust

OI1_13 (101) OI1_13 (102) OI1_13 (105)

Long-Horned Beetle

OI1_14 (101) OI1_14 (102) OI1_14 (104)

Lucanus Stag Beetle

OI1_15 (101) OI1_15 (103) OI1_15 (105)

Goliath Horned Flower Beetle

OI1_16 (104) OI1_16 (101) OI1_16 (103)

Hercules Giant Beetle

OI1_17 (101) OI1_17 (103) OI1_17 (104)

Additionally, Kawahata did something pretty cool with his models that weren’t included on Nishikawa’s. Taking the edge of a square as length 1.0, he showed each model next to a scale as a fraction of this. That way, you’ll know the size of insect you’ll end up with. Similarly, I took end model scans of each Nishikawa insect to show the scales of the models I got below.

OI1_SN_10-17

Scaled Works of Satoshi Kamiya 18-19

Origami, Scaled Works of Satoshi Kamiya

These are the last models in the first Works of Satoshi Kamiya books. There is a second book, and I just got it. So, I’ll also do those soon. The scaling is 27.9 cm squares for each model.

WOSK_118 - ANCIENT DRAGON (1) WOSK_118 - ANCIENT DRAGON (3)

The first is the Ancient Dragon. This was also Tanteidan Magazine’s first Crease Pattern Challenge, which I already did a post for. I only have one picture of him in that one, maybe in anticipation of this one. I think there’s a difference, but just in internal structure, so you can’t really see it here. However, you can see the eight horns much better in these pictures.

The last model is Mammuthus primigenius, a woolly mammoth. So… I thought I’d have more to say about woolly mammoths. I thought I knew more about them, but I guess I just like them because they’re like fuzzy elephants. I couldn’t remember or find much pop culture of them either, except this, which is fantastic (whole thing).

WOSK_119 - MAMMUTHUS PRIMIGENIUS (5) WOSK_119 - MAMMUTHUS PRIMIGENIUS (3)

This mammoth was done with thicker paper to help keep the shape, show the color change, and give a bit of a fur look. Usually, my detailing isn’t great, but I like how the nose came out.

Montroll’s Dragons and Other Creatures

Miscellaneous, Origami

I haven’t posted in a while mainly because I was traveling, but I actually got two origami books there when I was free. The first is Works of Satoshi Kamiya 2, which means I’ll have that to do after the first one. The second one is Dragons and Other Fantastic Creatures in Origami by John Montroll. I did the models in that book in the car ride back home.

MONTROLL - DRAGONS AND ~ BOOK - (102)

John Montroll is one of my favorite artists. He has hundreds of great designs in dozens of books. His animal origami book was one of my first ones, and some of his books I have (that are great) collect models of African animals, North American animals, prehistoric animals, and mythical creatures and the Chinese zodiac. His books tend to be organized by section (with each section sorted by increasing difficulty), and this one has sections of weapons, dragons, humanoids, and creatures.

MONTROLL - DRAGONS AND ~ BOOK - (103) MONTROLL - DRAGONS AND ~ BOOK - (107)

The weapon and humanoid sections only have four models each, and the weapons are much more simple, warm-up models. The two-headed martian on the right has a face on each head (it’s a little hard to see in my pictures, sorry).

MONTROLL - DRAGONS AND ~ BOOK - (104) MONTROLL - DRAGONS AND ~ BOOK - (110)

MONTROLL - DRAGONS AND ~ BOOK - (105) MONTROLL - DRAGONS AND ~ BOOK - (106)

There are 10 different dragons, though some have similar bases. He has 1 to 3 headed dragons, then winged dragons, then eastern and western dragons, and then winged dragons with multiple heads.

MONTROLL - DRAGONS AND ~ BOOK - (108) MONTROLL - DRAGONS AND ~ BOOK - (109)

The creatures section includes a griffin, a unicorn (which I went a little cubic on), a wyvern, a phoenix, and various animals with wings attached. The last model is one of the best; it’s a unicorn with wings (or a pegasus with a horn).

Crease Pattern Challenge 001

Crease Pattern Challenge, Origami

The Japan Origami Academic Society puts out a magazine bimonthly. (And by that I mean once every two months. Not twice a month. It’s a terrible word. Maybe “hexaannually” would be better?) They also have yearly conventions and put out a very nice book that corresponds to each meeting.

Starting with issue 55, the magazine has had a section called “Crease Pattern Challenge”. This is only a single page with a crease pattern for people to try to fold. A crease pattern is just a square with lines on it that represent the final folds of the model. The first of these is actually the “Ancient Dragon” by Satoshi Kamiya. You already know I like his models, and this model is also in his book.

OTMCP_001 - ANCIENT DRAGON - KAMIYA

I think there are slight differences between this one and the one in his book. Since I’m going to put up the book Ancient Dragon soon anyway, I’m adding some other models here for, like, flavour, or something.

KAMIYA - BAHAMUT BL (1) KAMIYA - BAHAMUT BL (5)

Kamiya’s Ancient Dragon and Bahamut models are actually pretty similar. While the final Bahamut might not show it, Bahamut BL (or God Dragon Bahamut) looks a bit like the Ancient Dragon.

KAMIYA - BAHAMUT BL (2) KAMIYA - BAHAMUT BL (3)

While Kamiya’s looks like the dragon it’s supposed to, mine looks more like a dragon-bird. I got kind of hung up on there only being two legs, I guess. Still, I think a dragon-raven looks pretty nice.

KAMIYA - BAHAMUT ZERO (2)

I accidentally changed Bahamut ZERO as well. As I said before, his Bahamuts have a kind of similar pattern to his Ancient Dragon. Due to that, I ended up folding the ZERO model like a dragon initially and just liked it so much I kept it that way. He’s also got some kind of insect-like mandibles or maybe side teeth. I can’t tell if that’s in the original model too; it’s so shiny.

KAMIYA - BAHAMUT ZERO (3) KAMIYA - BAHAMUT ZERO (4)

I hope to stumble through some more Crease Pattern Challenges, but some are quite difficult. So, we’ll see.

Ryuuzin 龍神

Miscellaneous, Origami

Satoshi Kamiya has some of the best origami in the world, and his Ryuuzin (Dragon God) is one of the most well know. For the Ryuuzin and several other projects, he has version numbers for each of his major improvements to the model. The following are my attempts at folding some of the released crease patterns.

New_KAMIYA - RYUZIN 1-2 (3) New_KAMIYA - RYUZIN 1-2 (2)

Dragon of Emperor

I’m not sure if this really counts as one, but the Dragon of Emperor has a very similar head to the Ryuuzin on his website. Since all the other Ryuuzin are versions 2 or above, I always assumed this was either a prototype or version 1. There used to be a random crease pattern section on Kamiya’s website (it might still be there, just not in the same place), and this was one of those crease patterns.

New_KAMIYA - RYUZIN 2-1 (2) New_KAMIYA - RYUZIN 2-1 (9)

Ryu Jin 2.1

The 2.1 Ryuuzin shows what makes this model special. The entire body of the model is covered in scales. Both the scaled skin and length are achieved by an ingenious design. This can be seen on the crease pattern at the bottom of the above link. The top right corner is the head and the bottom right corner is the tail. The scales run across the top and bottom edges, and the middle of the model is collapsed. This means the top and bottom edges on the left side of the model meet in the middle and allow a much longer dragon.

I had though I had folded a 3.1, but now I can’t even find a crease pattern for it. If I had folded one, I’ve probably given it away by now. You can have a look at Satoshi Kamiya’s original here: Ryu Jin 3.1

New_KAMIYA - RYUZIN 3-5 (1) New_KAMIYA - RYUZIN 3-5 (6)

Ryu Zin 3.5

The most recent version is 3.5, and its crease pattern wasn’t released until Kamiya’s Challenge book in 2010 (not counting exhibitions). It’s quite detailed (the crease pattern had to be put on the inside of the book jacket), and the book has some tips on folding portions of the dragon, such as the scales. This model took me quite a while, and I didn’t even articulate all of the scales.

Book Links:
OrigamiHouse (Japanese)
Origami Shop (French/English/Spanish/German)

For all of these models, the most complex part is probably the head. The body is more daunting than difficult, so you just have to be patient (or very stubborn).

New_KAMIYA - RYUZIN 3-5 (4) New_KAMIYA - RYUZIN 3-5 (8)